[edit] PgCert/PgDip/MSc in Hydrogen Safety Engineering

CONTENTS
1 PGCERT/PGDIP/MSC IN HYDROGEN SAFETY ENGINEERING
2 COURSE CONTENT
3 STUDY OPTIONS AND AWARD STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE
3.1 MSc Hydrogen Safety Engineering with PgCert and PgDip Exit Awards (Full-Time)
3.2 PgCert/PgDip/MSc Hydrogen Safety Engineering with PgCert and PgDip Exit Awards (Part-Time)
3.3 External Examiners
4 MODULE CONTENT, MODULE DELIVERY AND ASSESSMENT
4.1 MODULE PRINCIPLES OF HYDROGEN SAFETY
4.2 MODULE HYDROGEN SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES
4.3 MODULE REGULATIONS CODES AND STANDARDS
4.4 MODULE HYDROGEN POWERED TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURE SAFETY
4.5 MODULE PROGRESS IN FUEL CELL AND HYDROGEN TECNOLOGIES
4.6 DISSERTATION MODULE
5 ADMISSION
5.1 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
5.2 EXEMPTIONS
5.3 MODULE LISTINGS, CREDITS & FEES
5.4 CREDIT ACCUMULATION AND TRANSFER SCHEME (CATS)
5.5 APPLICATION/REGISTRATION

[edit] 1 PGCERT/PGDIP/MSC IN HYDROGEN SAFETY ENGINEERING

There is a growing need for specialists in Hydrogen Safety Engineering. The PgCert/PgDip/MSc in Hydrogen Safety Engineering, offered by the University of Ulster, is World’s first higher educational programme that enables graduates to specialise in this new and rapidly advancing field. The programme is intended for students who pursue careers in hydrogen safety, and for professionals already working in industry (process industry, energy industry, civil works, aerospace industry, automotive industry, etc.), transport and distribution, fire and rescue brigades, insurance, teaching institutions, research institutions and legislative bodies. Graduates with a PgCert/PgDip/MSc in Hydrogen Safety Engineering will be suitably qualified for employment opportunities at various industrial corporations, governmental bodies, research organisations and educational institutions.

[edit] 2 COURSE CONTENT

Hydrogen Safety Engineering is of vital importance to the onset and further development of the hydrogen economy. It concerns the study of phenomena connected to the safety of hydrogen e.g. unscheduled releases (permeation, subsonic and supersonic jet releases, cryogenic spills), accidental combustion (premixed combustion, partially-premixed and diffusion combustion, ignition and autoignition, jet fires, deflagration, detonation, thermal loads, pressure and shock waves), and material compatibility (embrittlement, hydrogen attack) to ensure the safety of hydrogen in a variety of practical applications (production, storage, transportation, utilisation, development of infrastructures); including the development and application of mitigation technologies, accident prevention methodologies, and, standards and legal requirements. In addition to providing the student with a systematic understanding of the scientific/technological principles and techniques involved in hydrogen safety, this programme aims at developing the skill and expertise to apply this knowledge to the provision of safety in a wide range of hydrogen applications.

The course consists of six modules, namely:

  • One 30 CATS Points Module Principles of Hydrogen Safety (compulsory)
  • One 30 CATS Points Module Hydrogen Safety Technologies (compulsory)
  • One 30 CATS Points Module Regulations, Codes and Standards (compulsory)
  • One 30 CATS Points Module Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety (optional)
  • One 30 CATS Points Module Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies (optional)
  • One 60 CATS Points Dissertation Module (compulsory)

Modules Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety, and, Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies are optional modules. Students select one of these modules.

The topical content of the modules complies with the International Curriculum on Hydrogen Safety Engineering, the development of which is aided by more than 60 experts (see Table 1 of the International Curriculum on Hydrogen Safety Engineering). The teaching materials of the course include information derived from the European Summer School on Hydrogen Safety and the Joint European Summer School on Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology.

[edit] 3 STUDY OPTIONS AND AWARD STRUCTURE OF THE COURSE

The CATS Points gathered by studying the modules of the course contribute to the Final Award of Master of Science in Hydrogen Safety (requiring 180 CATS Points). Students can apply directly to the Master's, or can apply for a PgCert and then move on through the levels PgDip and MSc. To match specific student needs and entry qualifications there are two different study options leading to the Final Award of Master of Science in Hydrogen Safety:

[edit] 3.1 MSc Hydrogen Safety Engineering with PgCert and PgDip Exit Awards (Full-Time)

Full-Time mode: 1 Year, Course Code 6328, First semester: September to December, Second semester: February to May, Third semester: June to August.
Click here for a .pdf of the Course Structure Diagram
Click here for an overview of the module contributions to each award

This study option is meant for students with a second class honours degree or better. Modules Principles of Hydrogen Safety, Hydrogen Safety Technologies, Regulations Codes and Standards, and, one of the two optional Modules Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety or Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies, are to be completed in Semester 1 and 2 of the First Year. The Dissertation Module is completed in Semester 3 of the First Year.

  • The degree Master of Science in Hydrogen Safety Engineering shall be conferred upon successful completion of five of the six Modules, namely, Principles of Hydrogen Safety, Hydrogen Safety Technologies, Regulations Codes and Standards, one of the two optional Modules Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety or Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies, and, Dissertation.
  • The degree Postgraduate Diploma in Hydrogen Safety Engineering shall be conferred as an exit award if only four Modules, namely, Principles of Hydrogen Safety, Hydrogen Safety Technologies, Regulations Codes and Standards, and, one of the two optional Modules Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety or Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies have been completed successfully.
  • The degree Postgraduate Certificate in Hydrogen Safety Engineering shall be conferred as an exit award if only the two Modules, Principles of Hydrogen Safety, and, Hydrogen Safety Technologies, have been completed successfully.

[edit] 3.2 PgCert/PgDip/MSc Hydrogen Safety Engineering with PgCert and PgDip Exit Awards (Part-Time)

Part-Time mode: 3 Years, Course Code 5020, First semester: September to December, Second semester: February to May.
Click here for a .pdf of the Course Structure Diagram
Click here for an overview of the module contributions to each award

This study option is meant for students with a non-Honours degree or better. Modules Principles of Hydrogen Safety and Hydrogen Safety Technologies are to be completed in Semesters 1 and 2 of the First Year. Modules Regulations Codes and Standards, and, one of the two optional Modules Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety or Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies are to be completed in Semesters 1 and 2 of the Second Year. The Dissertation Module is completed in Semesters 1 and 2 of the Third Year.

  • The degree Postgraduate Certificate in Hydrogen Safety Engineering shall be conferred upon successful completion of the two Modules Principles of Hydrogen Safety and Hydrogen Safety Technologies. The Postgraduate Certificate in Hydrogen Safety Engineering qualifies you to undertake further study on Modules Regulations Codes and Standards, Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety and Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies for the award of Postgraduate Diploma in Hydrogen Safety Engineering.
  • The degree Postgraduate Diploma in Hydrogen Safety Engineering shall be conferred upon successful completion of Modules Regulations Codes and Standards, and, one of the two optional Modules Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety or Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies. The Postgraduate Diploma in Hydrogen Safety Engineering qualifies you to undertake further study on the Dissertation Module for the award of Master of Science in Hydrogen Safety Engineering.
  • The degree Master of Science in Hydrogen Safety Engineering shall be conferred upon successful completion of the Dissertation Module.


[edit] 3.3 External Examiners

  • Prof Jennifer X. Wen, Professor of Engineering at School of Engineering, University of Warwick, United Kingdom
  • Prof John T.S. Irvine, Professor of Chemistry at the University of St Andrews, United Kingdom


[edit] 4 MODULE CONTENT, MODULE DELIVERY AND ASSESSMENT

[edit] 4.1 MODULE PRINCIPLES OF HYDROGEN SAFETY

Click here for the Module Descriptor
Module Principles of Hydrogen Safety (30 CATS Points) seeks to develop in students the ability to integrate fundamental knowledge and engineering approaches from a variety of disciplines (thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics, combustion) to understand the origin and phenomenology of hydrogen safety problems. This module combines a variety of disciplines into an engineering framework called 'Principles of Hydrogen Safety'. Insight into these principles is developed to enable the student to cope with hydrogen safety problems involving unscheduled gaseous releases and cryogenic spills, dispersion of hydrogen (outdoor and indoor), thermal effects of hydrogen fires, and pressure effects of deflagrations and detonations. The module is taught in the distance learning mode and offered over two semesters of the academic year. It consists of nine lectures. The module is fully on-line and can be studied from anywhere in the world; there is no requirement to attend a specific campus location and there are no examinations. Assessment in this module is as follows. Learners are assessed by two coursework assignments (each contributing 50% towards the overall module result). The first coursework assignment is issued in the beginning of the module and has to be submitted to the Module Coordinator in the middle of the module. The second coursework assignment is issued in the middle of the module and has to be submitted to the Module Coordinator by the end of the module. The questions of the coursework assignments consist of a combination of problems to be solved, tests of factual knowledge, and short essays. On-line self-assessment and evaluation tools are also used to engage the learner with the subject matter. Each lecture is concluded by a simple multiple choice on-line assessment which must be completed prior to proceeding onto the next lecture. Further details may be requested from the Module Coordinator: Dr. A.E. Dahoe at arief.dahoe@gmail.com.

[edit] 4.2 MODULE HYDROGEN SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES

Module Hydrogen Safety Technologies (30 CATS Points) concentrates on the state-of-the-art in hydrogen safety technologies which are applicable to all foreseeable hydrogen and fuel systems and applications. It seeks to develop in students an understanding of scientific and engineering principles for hydrogen safety applicable to different sectors in the hydrogen industry. Safety issues relevant to production, distribution, storage and use through to fuel cell safety, and the materials used are introduced; the safety strategies, innovative technologies and devices, as well as solutions associated with each, are being covered. This module elaborates on safety principles and techniques covered by module 'Principles of Hydrogen Safety', and it provides a context for and describes in detail recent advances in the field. The purpose of this module is to give a detailed scientific background and demonstrate application of hydrogen safety engineering principles in practice through various safety technologies and case studies. The module is taught in the distance learning mode and offered over two semesters of the academic year. It consists of nine lectures. The module is fully on-line and can be studied from anywhere in the world; there is no requirement to attend a specific campus location and there are no examinations. Assessment in this module is as follows. Learners are assessed by two coursework assignments (each contributing 50% towards the overall module result). The first coursework assignment is issued in the beginning of the module and has to be submitted to the Module Coordinator in the middle of the module. The second coursework assignment is issued in the middle of the module and has to be submitted to the Module Coordinator by the end of the module. The questions of the coursework assignments consist of a combination of problems to be solved, tests of factual knowledge, and short essays. On-line self-assessment and evaluation tools are also used to engage the learner with the subject matter. In addition, sample questions will be completed by students early in the semester to enable formative feedback before marked coursework is submitted. Each lecture is concluded by a simple multiple choice on-line assessment which must be completed prior to proceeding onto the next lecture. Further details may be requested from the Module Coordinator: Dr. A.E. Dahoe at arief.dahoe@gmail.com.

[edit] 4.3 MODULE REGULATIONS CODES AND STANDARDS

Click here for the Module Descriptor

Module Regulations, Codes and Standards (30 CATS Points) focuses on developments in regulations, codes and standards (RCS) relevant to safety of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies, systems, and infrastructure. The terminology, hierarchy and content associated with various RCS in the field are covered. Differences in the regulatory framework and several key RCS which are relevant to hydrogen safety globally are analysed in detail. A hydrogen safety engineering framework is presented and the role of RCS within this is taught. The differences between prescriptive and performance-based approaches are explained with examples. Risk assessment methodologies and an appreciation of good practices related to hydrogen applications is given. The module is taught in the distance learning mode and offered over two semesters of the academic year. It consists of nine lectures. The module is fully on-line and can be studied from anywhere in the world; there is no requirement to attend a specific campus location and there are no examinations. Assessment in this module is as follows. Learners are assessed by two coursework assignments (each contributing 50% towards the overall module result). The first coursework assignment is issued in two stages, the first question is issued at the beginning of semester 1 and has to be submitted to the Module Coordinator by the middle of semester 1, enabling feedback to be given before the remainder of the coursework is submitted. The second coursework assignment is issued in the middle of the module and has to be submitted to the Module Coordinator by the end of the module. The questions of the coursework assignments consist of a combination of problems to be solved, tests of factual knowledge, and short essays. On-line self-assessment and evaluation tools are also used to engage the learner with the subject matter. Each lecture is concluded by a simple multiple choice on-line assessment which must be completed prior to proceeding onto the next lecture. Further details may be requested from the Module Coordinator: Dr. A.E. Dahoe at arief.dahoe@gmail.com

[edit] 4.4 MODULE HYDROGEN POWERED TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURE SAFETY

Module Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety (30 CATS Points) covers the need that arises from the current and future aspects of hydrogen technologies (well established or under investigation) as they affect the current public perception on issues in hydrogen safety. The up to date developments and progress in the fields of hydrogen use as an energy carrier for transport, delivery and infrastructure are taught. The module focuses on the safety issues relevant to hydrogen-powered vehicles, current infrastructure of hydrogen distribution and delivery. This module's design complements and enhances the understanding of the knowledge students acquired from modules 'Principles of Hydrogen Safety' and 'Hydrogen Safety Technologies' which is relevant to safety of hydrogen-powered transport and associated infrastructure for on-site production, storage, delivery, refuelling, etc. The module is taught in the distance learning mode and offered over two semesters of the academic year. It consists of nine lectures. The module is fully on-line and can be studied from anywhere in the world; there is no requirement to attend a specific campus location and there are no examinations. Assessment in this module is as follows. Learners are assessed by two coursework assignments (each contributing 50% towards the overall module result). The first coursework assignment is issued in the beginning of the module and has to be submitted to the Module Coordinator in the middle of the module. The second coursework assignment is issued in the middle of the module and has to be submitted to the Module Coordinator by the end of the module. The questions of the coursework assignments consist of a combination of problems to be solved, tests of factual knowledge, and short essays. On-line self-assessment and evaluation tools are also used to engage the learner with the subject matter. Each lecture is concluded by a simple multiple choice on-line assessment which must be completed prior to proceeding onto the next lecture.

[edit] 4.5 MODULE PROGRESS IN FUEL CELL AND HYDROGEN TECNOLOGIES

Module Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies (30 CATS Points) provides the latest knowledge in hydrogen and fuel cell safety issues and advancements in the field of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Students acquire further knowledge through dissemination of the latest developments in the field by world leading experts. The module content is updated rapidly with new information as it becomes available through block releases in the form of (i) Summer and winter schools (ii) the International Short Course and Advanced Research Workshop Series 'Progress in Hydrogen Safety', (iii) Advanced Research Workshops, (iv) Thematic Seminars, etc. It elaborates on the topics addressed by Principles of Hydrogen Safety and Hydrogen Safety Technologies and covers advances in different areas, as for example, hydrogen safety engineering, including inherently safe design and mitigation technologies; safety issues in the hydrogen infrastructure; safety issues related to hydrogen-powered vehicles, fuel cell technologies, etc. The module is delivered via block releases and is web supported. The module is offered over two semesters and students must chose two short courses to attend. The assessment in this module is as follows. Learners are assessed by two coursework assignments (each contributing 50% towards the overall module result). There is one piece of coursework per short course. Students submit the coursework in two parts, enabling feedback to be given before the remainder of the coursework is submitted. The questions of the coursework assignments consist of a combination of problems to be solved, tests of factual knowledge, and short essays. choice on-line assessment which must be completed prior to proceeding onto the next lecture.

[edit] 4.6 DISSERTATION MODULE

MSc candidates are required to carry out a research project leading to a dissertation. This 60 CATS Points fully on-line module requires students to carry out rigorous investigative research into an aspect of hydrogen safety suggested by a student or the Module Coordinator and approved by the Dissertation Committee, consisting of the Course Committee and External Examiner. A dissertation of at most 20000 words and a presentation are then required for assessment. Projects are chosen and carried out on an individual basis, making use of knowledge gained in the taught modules of the course and applying it in a situation appropriate to each student's research interest, employment arrangements and expertise. The project should involve a significant amount of original work on the part of the student, under the guidance of a supervisor(s) appointed by the Dissertation Committee. External advisors may be assigned by the Dissertation Committee. These may be senior researchers at the location of the student where the dissertation is prepared.

  • For full-time students, this module is offered in Semester 3 of the Academic Year.
  • Part-time students take this module in Semesters 1 and 2 of the Academic Year.

Students are expected to have completed Modules Principles of Hydrogen Safety, Hydrogen Safety Technologies, Regulations Codes and Standards, and, one of the two optional Modules Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety or Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies prior to taking this module.

A non-exhaustive list of dissertation topics is circulated to students before the beginning of the module to assist them with the selection of a dissertation subject. Learners are expected to select a dissertation topic and submit a synopsis of their chosen topic for consideration by the Course Committee in the first two weeks from the start of the module. The synopsis should not exceed two A4 pages in length and include: the title, aims and objectives, summary and research strategy. Students will be informed by the Module Coordinator about the Dissertation Committee's decision regarding their submissions not later than six weeks after the start of the module. Students obtaining the approval by the Course Committee of their selected topic will be required to prepare and present to the Course Committee normally within 3 weeks (full-time) or 6 weeks (part-time):

  • A detailed research programme.
  • A preliminary review of the relevant literature.
  • A detailed treatment of the research strategy and methods to be employed.

By the end of the module, the student is expected to submit the dissertation to the Module Coordinator. The dissertation will be assessed by the supervisor and reviewed by at least one other member of the Course Committee, taking into account content, style and presentation. A final summary mark shall be agreed upon.

[edit] 5 ADMISSION

[edit] 5.1 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Students can apply directly to the Master's, or can apply for a PgCert and then move on through the levels PgDip and MSc. Applicants must

a) have gained

(i) a second class honours degree or better in a cognate discipline for entry to the Master’s programme, or,
an Honours or non-Honours degree in a cognate discipline for entry to the linked Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma/Master’s programme
from a university of the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, from the Council for National Academic Awards, the National Council for Educational Awards, the Higher Education and Training Awards Council or from an institution of another country which has been recognised as being of an equivalent standard; or
(ii) for Master’s: an equivalent standard (normally 50%) in a Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate, Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma or an approved alternative qualification;
for linked PgCert/PgDip/MSc: an equivalent standard in a Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma or an approved alternative qualification;

and

(b) provide evidence of competence in written and spoken English (GCSE grade C or equivalent) and evidence of competence in mathematics (GCSE grade C or equivalent);

or, as an alternative to (a) (i) or (a) (ii) and/or (b):

(c) in exceptional circumstances, where an individual has substantial and significant experiential learning, a portfolio of written evidence demonstrating the meeting of graduate qualities (including subject-specific outcomes, as determined by the Course Committee) may be considered as an alternative entrance route. Evidence used to demonstrate graduate qualities may not be used for exemption against modules within the programme.

For non-native English speakers the required English language standard for admission is IELTS 6.0 (with a score of 5.5 in reading, listening, speaking and writing) or TOEFL (where the University requires a minimum score of 550). Applicants who have studied English as a foreign language at secondary school level satisfy this requirement.

[edit] 5.2 EXEMPTIONS

In exceptional circumstances, as an alternative to (a) (i) or (a) (ii) and/or (b) above, where an individual has substantial and significant experiential learning, a portfolio of written evidence demonstrating the meeting of graduate qualities (including subject-specific outcomes, as determined by the Course Committee) may be considered as an alternative entrance route. Evidence used to demonstrate graduate qualities may not be used for exemption against modules within the programme. Studies pursued and examinations passed in respect of other qualifications awarded by the University or by another university or other educational institution, or evidence from the accreditation of prior experiential learning, may be accepted as exempting candidates from part of the programme provided that

(a) they shall register as students of the University for modules amounting to at least the final third of the credit value of the award at the highest level.
(b) no exemption shall be permitted from the dissertation.

[edit] 5.3 MODULE LISTINGS, CREDITS & FEES

  • A PgCert generally has a weighting of 60 CATS Points.
  • A PgDip generally has a weighting of 120 CATS Points.
  • An MSc/MA generally has a weighting of 180 CATS Points.

The normal cost per credit for Academic Year 2014/15 is £22.25 for EU students and £56.90 for non EU students. Click here to see the Guidance Notes for Students on Home/EU/Overseas Fees Status. The tuition fees of the modules of the Master of Science in Hydrogen Safety Engineering are as follows:

Module CATS Points ECTS Points EU students non-EU students
Principles of Hydrogen Safety 30 15 £667.50 £1,707.00
Hydrogen Safety Technologies 30 15 £667.50 £1,707.00
Regulations, Codes and Standards 30 15 £667.50 £1,707.00
Hydrogen Powered Transport and Infrastructure Safety 30 15 £667.50 £1,707.00
Module Progress in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies 30 15 £667.50 £1,707.00
Dissertation 60 30 £1,335.00 £3,414.00
Full Programme CATS Points ECTS Points EU students non-EU students
Postgraduate Certificate in Hydrogen Safety Engineering 60 30 £1,335.00 £3,414.00
Postgraduate Diploma in Hydrogen Safety Engineering 120 60 £2,670.00 £6,828.00
Master of Science in Hydrogen Safety Engineering 180 90 £4,005.00 £10,242.00

This information should be used only as a guide to the normal costs of a distance learning programme, and the University of Ulster's finance website should be used as the definitive source of fees information.

[edit] 5.4 CREDIT ACCUMULATION AND TRANSFER SCHEME (CATS)

The Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme (CATS) is a system whereby academic credits are awarded for courses or parts of courses. These enable students to transfer from course to course or institution to institution, or to gain exemption from part(s) of a course. Consult the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System and the Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme for more information.

[edit] 5.5 APPLICATION/REGISTRATION

This programme was taught from Academic Years 2006/07 to 2015/16. The programme is no longer offered beyond Academic Year 2015/16

FACULTY CONTACT
Paul Brown

Programme Manager Hydrogen Safety
& Renewable Energy Courses
Room 26B16, Block 26
Faculty of Art, Design & the Built Environment
University of Ulster
Jordanstown Campus
Shore Road BT37 0QB
Northern-Ireland
Email: p.brown@ulster.ac.uk

COURSE DIRECTOR
2006 - 2016

Dr Arief Dahoe

Lecturer in Hydrogen Safety
Faculty of Art, Design & the Built Environment
University of Ulster
Jordanstown Campus
Shore Road BT37 0QB
Northern-Ireland
Email: arief.dahoe@gmail.com


File translated by Arief Dahoe from TeX using TtH, version 3.68. On 24 Sep 2015, 08:02.